15
Jan

Assembling Your Sonata Spinning Wheel

Moving from a drop spindle to a spinning wheel can be a fun and exciting change – but if you are completely new to spinning wheels, it can also feel a bit overwhelming. Not only are you changing from a small, portable tool to one that is larger and more stationary – but there is also a whole new world of terminology to learn.

Although there are different styles and variations, the main parts
and mechanics of a spinning wheel remain fairly consistent. So if you’re new to scotch tension, break bands, and mother-of-alls; we’ve made a video tutorial that shows just how easy it is to assemble the Kromski Sonata spinning wheel.

8
Jan

New Crafts for a New Year: Kelley’s Wheel Spinning Class

It was just about this time last year when I created a little list of crafting resolutions for myself. Looking back over my list just a year later, I have to admit that it felt pretty good to see my goals in relation to all of the things that I’ve been able to try over the past year. I’ve explored the world of crochet more and have a few projects under my belt (including an in-progress blanket!), I learned a lot about fiber and silk hankies, but my number one goal was to move from a drop spindle to a spinning wheel. And I’m pleased to report that I’ve utterly and completely gone head over heels for spinning! I’m collecting fiber just as fast as yarn, and having so much fun pairing my handspun yarns for special projects and gifts.

If you’re like me and are ready to (or have just made) the transition from spindle to wheel, but need a bit of extra guidance – be sure to check out Kelley’s Wheel Spinning class! This 6-part video class covers everything from the basics to fiber choices and the mechanics of your wheel to spinning and plying.

11
Dec

Personalize a Pendleton

To say that this week’s technique of the week was a treat to work on is an understatement – I am just pleased as punch at how this turned out! All of us loved the satchels that Pendleton designed for Knit Picks, so it was only natural that we adorned these chic bags with a wee bit of fiber love! Not only was this a super fun project, but it’s also a speedy (and easy!) way to add a personalized touch to your Pendleton bag – especially if the bag is a gift for a friend or family member.

In honor of our rather wet winters here in the Pacific Northwest, I needle felted a lil’ cloud with multi-color raindrops onto the grey Pendleton satchel. And if the bag is a gift, I can totally see monogramming or spelling out the recipient’s name onto the bag as a cute personalized touch.

We even have a video tutorial that shows you just how easy it is to personalize your Pendleton!

29
Oct

Design a Sweater, lesson 6: Working the Yoke

The yoke is the most complicated part of a raglan sweater, but I think you’ll find that if you take it slow and work
carefully, it is not very hard at all! The trickiest thing is that the raglan decreases and neckline shaping will be worked
at the same time.This is also the most exciting part of the sweater–we are
nearing the finish line and for the first time, you’ll get to see your work really start to come together. Pun intended.
Let’s get started!

Read on for the videos and worksheet:

29
Oct

Design A Sweater, Lesson 7: Finishing!

Hi Knitters! This final edition of the sweater class is all about
finishing. In this week’s video and handout, I’ll discuss weaving in
ends, how to finish your turned hem, closing up the underarms, and
working the neckline trim! Whew! Each step goes pretty fast, but make
sure to take the time to do these steps right, as a well-finished
sweater will look a lot better than one with sloppy finishing.

Check out our tutorials on finishing, too–they’ll give you a
lot of information on how to execute the techniques discussed in this
lesson.

Finshing Tutorials

Another resource I really like and use a lot is Nancie Wiseman’s Knitter’s Book of Finishing Techniques, which is a wealth of information on every bit of swea=ter finishing you could imagine!

And without further ado, here’s your handout for this week:

29
Oct

Design A Sweater, Lesson 1: Swatching and Measuring

Ok, are we all ready to start swatching? Last week we discussed yarn
choices and design dreaming, and this week we are going to solidify our
yarn choices (if you haven’t already!) and find the right needle to get
the fabric that your design requires! I’ve done some extensive
swatching (the results of which I share in the videos below) and have
settled on knitting my Swish Worsted on US 6 Zephyr needles.

Swatching can seem boring when you’re itching to cast on a
project, but it is one of the most essential parts of the design
process, so it deserves a lot of time and attention! In this lesson,
I’ll be giving tips on how to swatch for the fabric your design needs,
and then covering the measuring of gauge from your swatch, and the
measurements needed for a succesful knit. All this information ins
contained in the pdf linked below, which also has diagrams and blanks
for you to fill in with your personal gauge and measurments. Don’t
worry if you’re math-phobic; I’ve done my nest to keep it simple and to
walk you through all the claculations step-by-step!

Lesson 1: Swatching and Measuring

Read on for more info and Videos…

29
Oct

Design a Sweater, Lesson 3: Shaping the Torso

Hi there! As you’ll see in this week’s video, my sweater is coming
along swimmingly! Now that I am deep in the process of working the waist
shaping, I am remembering why my row counter is my best friend!

This week, we’ll be discussing how to calculate the increases
and decreases that will shape the torso of your sweater to the finished
dimensions you desire. It may be helpful for you to look over and print
out this week’s handout so that you can follow along with the video
lesson, in which I’ll be walking you through all the math required in
this step. I promise, it’s not terribly hard :) Click the link below to
get the handout:

Lesson 3 – Shaping the Torso

And check out the videos below!

25
Oct

Embroidery: How to do the Duplicate Stitch

To round out our embroidery tutorial series, this week’s technique is all about duplicate stitch! This particular stitch lets you embroider on top of your existing stitches of stockinette fabric in a contrasting color. It also mimics the structure of your stitches, making it a fairly seamless way to add colorful motifs or other designs onto your knitting. And I must say – this is the perfect technique for smaller projects when I don’t feel up to using stranded knitting or intarsia to create the motif or pattern.

So to help you get started with the duplicate stitch, check out Kerin’s video tutorial on this technique.

17
Oct

Embroidery: How to do the Crochet Chain Stitch

Keeping in the theme of embroidery, this week’s technique highlights the crochet chain stitch! This embroidery technique allows you to easily create
outlines for shapes and motifs with a stitch that actually resembles the shape of
a knit stitch. Whether you outline an intarsia pattern or you create freeform shapes across a pillow or blanket, the possibility for using this stitch to introduce fun pops of color into your next project are endless. The beauty of this particular stitch is that you can really create curves and shapes, making it up as you go right on top of the surface of your knitted fabric.

And to help you embellish your knits, watch Kerin’s video tutorial on the crochet chain to get started!