27
Feb

Foreign Correspondent’s Cowl

I found out a week ago that a wonderful, dear-to-me-friend would be
visiting Seattle this weekend and my first thought was that I definitely
wanted to knit her a little present. However, a week isn’t much time to
whip a present up and I wanted to make sure it was something she would
want to wear in the mild climes of Arizona. So I began trawling through
my magical Ravelry queue and found Lexy Lu’s Foreign Correspondent’s Scarf.
I loved the lace pattern, the simple repeate and the fact that I could
easily turn it into a cowl if I didn’t have time to knit a full scarf.

15
Jan

Beads, glorious beads!

Did you see? We now carry beads for you to add to your knitting!

Beads add a wonderful element to knitted items. They add sparkle and
drape to lace shawls, fancy highlights to handbags, and they stand out
against plainer items to create something special. With this in mind, I
wrote the Starry Stole pattern!

This free pattern features a pattern of beads in a starry field on a background of simple stockinette stitch.

13
Jul

Elegant Simplicity

Sometimes when it comes to lace, less can be more!

Inspired by the hardy, well-adapted arctic willow, the Salix shawl takes cues from a seemingly barren landscape that’s far more alive than you might think!

Salix
is a full-sized Shetland-type shawl knit in Palette. Above a border of
Shells is a low-lying row of Buttercups. The body of the shawl is worked
in a pattern of Pebbles, with little variations just like those on a
beach. The stand-out feature, though, is the willow catkin running up
the shaped center panel.

3
Jul

How to Use a Lifeline for Lace Knitting

On my very first lace project, it was inevitable that I would make a mistake somewhere as I was working across with a few hundred stitches. This, of course, led to shedding a few tears before spending the next day ever-so-carefully unknitting several rows of lace. Fastforward a few months, when I stumbled across this amazing trick called a “lifeline.”

Simply put, a lifeline is a scrap piece of yarn that gets threaded through your live stitches on your needle and serves as a placeholder. If you realize you have made a mistake between your lifeline and the stitches on your needle, you can then happily pull your needle from the stitches and rip back until you hit your lifeline where you will find all of your stitches sitting happily on the scrap piece of yarn. You can then very easily place all of your stitches from your lifeline row back onto your needle, and continue forward!

And now,to take this little trick a step further, we’ve created a video tutorial that shows you how to use your Knit Picks Options Inchangeable Needles for lifelines! The best part? This useful tip shows you how to thread your lifeline scrap yarn through your stitches as you work across the row!

12
Jun

How to Block Lace

My summer knitting ritual consists of finishing up any sweaters that I may have still on the needles in favor of lace. It can be anything from a very large, traditional shawl to a cute, elongated shawlette – if it’s got lace, then it has a home on my needles during the warm, summer months. But, in order to fully appreciate all of the time and effort that went into the lace project, I definitely have to set aside a day of blocking for my projects.

If you are anything like me, you might even have more than one lace project set aside, just waiting to be blocked out into its full lace glory. It’s okay to admit it – blocking your project takes a bit of time and patience. Unfortunately, it is a necessary evil (in my opinion, anyways!) since your finished lace project will come off of the needles looking akin to an ugly duckling. The lace yarn is so feathery light that it cannot hold its intended shape. And like the duckling, it is awkward and clumsy. But fear not! With a little dedication, blocking will transform your duckling into the beautiful swan it wants to be.

And to help you reveal the regal and delicate elegance of your lace project, we’ve got a wonderful video tutorial to help you block your lace into shape!

8
Jun

It takes two

Up here in the Northwest, we seem to be straddling two seasons. It
makes for rather interesting weather, and a difficult time finding
something to wear!

It’s for those occasions – the not quite spring but not yet summer,
warm sun but cool breeze, the-AC-is-on-a-little-too-high type of days
that inspired the new Gemini Vest.

This tunic-length vest is knit in Stroll and Stroll Glimmer,
making it soft, shimmery and machine washable. The lower bodice and
back are knit in a subtle stranded pattern of diamonds that is echoed in
the lace upper bodice.

22
May

How to Read Lace Charts

Unlike last year when we had a very late spring/summer, we are getting a taste of summer a bit early here in the Northwest! For the past week, everyone has been absorbing the sunshine and enjoying the nice weather. In addition to changing up the wardrobe with skirts and dresses, warm weather also signals a change in my knitting habits. As soon as there are a few consecutive days of sunshine, it takes a lot more willpower to pick up that sweater I started last month. Instead, my needles long to cast on light and airy shawls.

Lace projects are my go-to summer project for so many reasons. I love that the project is small and lightweight, even though it will be large in size when blocked out. And I particularly love that I can squeeze my shawl project into a small bag that I bring with my when I ride my bike. And when I am done, my beautiful lace shawl keeps the chill off my shoulders on cool evenings. In my mind, lace knitting is portable, practical, and just plain fun!

However, if you are new to lace knitting, there are many reasons that might make you weary of equating lace knitting with fun. And to help you love lace as much as we do, Kerin and I worked together to create an in-depth video tutorial that goes over all aspects of reading charts for lace knitting!