Paige Family Dishcloth Pattern

Growing up, both my mom & my grandma were always knitting and crocheting – they had learned both so they didn’t feel any need to keep projects to one or the other.  When I first got interested in yarn crafts, my mom showed me how to make the dishcloths she and my grandmother always made.  Of course I tried it and even though my newbie misshapen pieces were not works of art, I enjoyed making them and used them for years.  So I thought I’d share the pattern with everyone doing the 52 Weeks of Dishcloths!

Paige Family Dishcloth from Knit Picks

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Podcast Call for Entries: Designer CRUSH

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Is there one designer you really love? Have you knit too many of their designs to even count? If you have what we’re calling a “designer crush”, total admiration and love for a knitwear/crochet designer, let us know! You could get to talk to that designer for an upcoming podcast, and ask her/him the questions on your mind. Email us at podcast@knitpicks.com. We’d love to hear from you!

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Little Projects

I always try to keep a small project on my hooks or needles as a sort of crafty “palate cleanser” while I’m working on intense, long-term projects. I’ve noticed that it helps to keep me motivated and excited about those big pieces if I can take a mini break and finish something else quickly. My newest favorite mini knit is Purl Soho’s free Garter Flap Hat (teeny tiny baby sized).

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Pompom Love, Part 1: Kids!

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As you may have noticed, this office has fallen in love with pompoms. Pompoms are so great because not only can they be the perfect finishing touch to your knitting project, they can be their own perfect object! In the next few months, we’ll be exploring how you can use pompoms in creative ways with different KnitPicks yarns. First up, we’ll see how Chroma lends itself to 3 adorable ways you can use pompoms, with kids!

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Staccato Dishcloth Pattern

Staccato Dishcloth Pattern

I love experimenting with interesting textures and stitch patterns – and the dishcloth is simply the ideal blank canvas for projects like these. Plus, it’s a great way to rediscover old favorites in your yarn stash, since you won’t need too much yarn to make a dishcloth.

For the Staccato Dishcloth pattern, a series of repeating and alternating slip stitches are used to create a fabric with subtle sculptural qualities. The slip stitches are also what create the slight ripple effect on the edges.

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