16
Jul

Knitting Scarves from Around the World

Every knitter appreciates our craft’s heritage but exploring all of those traditions is certainly daunting. On the other hand, just reading the history of sweaters like ganseys, Fair Isle, Norwegian, Cowichan and other fiber reflections of culture somehow doesn’t seem like quite enough. Thanks to Kari Cornell, you can use what I think is a brilliant way to blend samplers, utilitarians items and heritage into completely approachable projects – scarves!

Sometimes I am blown away by the way such a simple concept can be so brilliant! Think about it, scarves have been providing warmth, comfort, or decoration to both men and women almost as long as human civilization has existed. So says Donna Druchunas at the very beginning of her introduction to Knitting Scarves from Around the World. Then she goes on to appeal to my love of knitting history focusing on head and neck coverings. All the way back to 2900 B.C. and all around the world including Mesopotamia, Egypt, China, Rome on up through seventeenth century Croatian soldiers, King Charles II of England and the aeronautical scarves of Amelia Earhart, Howard Hughes and WWI’s “Red Baron”.

13
Jul

Elegant Simplicity

Sometimes when it comes to lace, less can be more!

Inspired by the hardy, well-adapted arctic willow, the Salix shawl takes cues from a seemingly barren landscape that’s far more alive than you might think!

Salix
is a full-sized Shetland-type shawl knit in Palette. Above a border of
Shells is a low-lying row of Buttercups. The body of the shawl is worked
in a pattern of Pebbles, with little variations just like those on a
beach. The stand-out feature, though, is the willow catkin running up
the shaped center panel.

12
Jul

Dyeing with Bare Hare

When Bare Hare arrived to at our office, everyone’s first reaction was to uncontrollably “ohhh!” and “ahhhh” over how incredibly squishy and soft it was. Then almost immediately afterward, it seemed as though the same idea popped up for everyone at the same time – Bare Hare is an undyed yarn, which means you can dye it whatever shade is your color of choice! All of us have had previous dyeing experience and so of course, we couldn’t help but jump over to the dyeing section of the Knit Picks website to check out the different dyes and colors.

In addition to the Jacquard dyes, we were also drawn to the Earthues and Greener Shades dyes. And because we loved Bare Hare so much, we thought – why not experiment a bit and try out all three different types of dyes? I had been wanted to try out the Greener Shades Dyes, so I opted for the Coral Reef Aqua. Stacey chose Emerald in the Jacquard Dyes and Kerin went with the Earthues natural dyes.

Here is the result of our Bare Hare dyeing extravaganza, I love how they turned out!

11
Jul

Summer is for Socks

I’ve been hit with SOCK FEVER! I loved doing the color maps for the new Stroll Handpainted
yarns and couldn’t wait to start knitting socks with the pretty skeins
when they arrived at the office a few months ago. I grabbed a skein of
Leg Warmer and knit my very first toe-up, two-at-a-time socks!

10
Jul

Delicious FOs!

There’s nothing better than finishing a long-term project. And for me,
that’s most of them – but they’re not all knitting! This past week has
been spent in the garden, reaping the rewards of the last year’s work.

But of course that’s not all – I finally wove in the ends on my little Chroma sweater!

6
Jul

A Quartet of Headbands

This week, summer finally showed up in the Pacific Northwest – I realize that most of the rest of the country is in a record breaking heat wave but here in Oregon/Washington, it had been quite a chilly, rainy June. But no more! Now with the warmer weather, we are all scrambling to ditch our wool sweater projects and looking for some knitting/crochet projects that we can work on that won’t overheat us and that will be useful, whatever the temperature.

As it happens, Allyson Dykhuizen has a new free pattern that fits perfectly.

This is her Quartet of Headbands – 4 cute and light projects, perfect to knit up & wear immediatly, no matter the weather.

5
Jul

Fightin’ Words are Ready to Fight Some Crime!

All those baddies, small time criminals and other creatures of the night
have a new mitten-wearing crime fighter in the neighborhood to keep an
eye out for! My mittens are done! I was so excited about them that I
wore them around the office while they were still damp from blocking
today. I can’t wait for some cooler weather in the fall so that I can
break these guys out and wreak some vigilante justice. Or maybe just
grab a cocoa down the street. Either way, I’m one happy lady today.
Anyone else finish something they’ve been looking forward to today?

3
Jul

How to Use a Lifeline for Lace Knitting

On my very first lace project, it was inevitable that I would make a mistake somewhere as I was working across with a few hundred stitches. This, of course, led to shedding a few tears before spending the next day ever-so-carefully unknitting several rows of lace. Fastforward a few months, when I stumbled across this amazing trick called a “lifeline.”

Simply put, a lifeline is a scrap piece of yarn that gets threaded through your live stitches on your needle and serves as a placeholder. If you realize you have made a mistake between your lifeline and the stitches on your needle, you can then happily pull your needle from the stitches and rip back until you hit your lifeline where you will find all of your stitches sitting happily on the scrap piece of yarn. You can then very easily place all of your stitches from your lifeline row back onto your needle, and continue forward!

And now,to take this little trick a step further, we’ve created a video tutorial that shows you how to use your Knit Picks Options Inchangeable Needles for lifelines! The best part? This useful tip shows you how to thread your lifeline scrap yarn through your stitches as you work across the row!